Association between severity of cardiac dysfunction caused by ventricular pre-excitation-led dyssynchrony and cardiac function recovery after ablation in children

Zhang Y, Li XM, Jiang H, Cui J, Ge HY, Liu HJ, Li MT.
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2020 Apr 28. doi: 10.1111/jce.14521. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 32343451
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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association between the severity of cardiac dysfunction caused by ventricular pre-excitation-led dyssynchrony and cardiac function recovery time after catheter ablation and identify predictors of cardiac function recovery after ablation.

Methods and results: A total of 49 children underwent successful ablation (median 2.92 years). This study included 23 patients with mild cardiac dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF]: 45% ≤ LVEF ≤ 55%), 15 with moderate (30% ≤ LVEF < 45%), and 11 with severe (LVEF <30%). The time for mean LVEF reaching 55% was 0.75, 3, and more than 12 months, respectively. The mean LVEF of children with severe cardiac dysfunction aged ≤6 years normalized within 12 months of follow-up (63.00% ± 1.41%). Mean LVEF of those aged more than 6 years did not normalize at 12 months of follow-up (38.67% ± 10.97%). LVEF recovery time was significantly different between these two age groups (median 11 months vs >12 months, χ2 = 4.55; P = .04). Cox regression analysis showed that preablation smaller left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd) Z score and higher LVEF were predictors of cardiac dysfunction recovery time (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-0.99, P = .04; HR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.03-1.15, P = .01).

Conclusion: Patients with higher LVDd Z scores and lower LVEF tend to have slower improvement in cardiac function after ablation. Patients with LVEF less than 30% and aged more than 6 years need more than 12 months to fully recover, and some might not even completely recover. Early catheter ablation is suggested once ventricular pre-excitation-led cardiac dysfunction is suspected.

 

source:https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32343451

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